Fairfax Co. Board of Supervisors adopts redistricting plan for election districts

Virginia

FAIRFAX COUNTY, Va. (WDVM) — The Fairfax County Board of Supervisors has adopted a redistricting plan for nine election districts.

“Redistricting is a legally required process to draw new electoral boundaries to ensure proportional representation as populations grow and shift over time. It is done to create election districts with roughly equal numbers of people, although mathematical precision isn’t required,” read a press release from the county.

The plan will shift seven of those precincts into different districts, in whole or in part:

  • 626 – Saratoga (from Mount Vernon to Springfield)
  • 703 -Fort Buffalo (from Providence to Mason)
  • 717 – Woodburn (split between Providence and Mason)
  • 730 – Penderbrook (from Providence to Springfield)
  • 827 – Irving (from Springfield to Braddock)
  • 840 – West Springfield (from Springfield to Lee)
  • 933 – Compton (from Sully to Springfield)

“This map, which was originally submitted by a member of the public, is the product of months of input from our residents, the Redistricting Advisory Committee and members of our board…Extensive outreach in the redistricting process has been a longtime priority for our board and produced a fair, nonpartisan and transparent process. These small adjustments aim to take population changes into account while minimizing the disruption to the daily lives of our residents and keeping communities together.”

Chairman Jeffrey McKay

The plan maintains nine local election districts, shifting seven precincts to new districts. The next step is for the districts to be certified by the Virginia Attorney General, a process that could take up to 60 days. Once certified, the districts will be in place for the next 10 years.

Public input was crucial, as residents were able to submit their own proposed maps for consideration.

“The public at large was able to use the remapping tools on the county’s website to develop maps for consideration by both the committee and the board,” said Erin Ward, Fairfax Deputy County Attorney. “This year, members of the public submitted 40 maps for consideration by the committee and the board.”

Ward says public participation greatly increased this year, compared to the three maps that were submitted for consideration ten years ago.

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